The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America

The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America

Khalil Gibran Muhammad Mirron Willis Barack Obama Hillary Rodham Clinton Donald J. Trump Rodney King Emmett Till Trayvon Martin Michael Brown Michael Ralph Frederick L. Hoffman Thomas Edison Kelly Miller Anna J. Thompson Ira De A. Reid Kenneth Clark Bryan Stevenson Nathaniel Shaler A. Leon Higginbotham Theodore Roosevelt Jim Crow Thomas Nelson Page James Forman Mike Lee Charles Ramsey Heather Ann Thompson James Baldwin Jason Van Dyke Laquan McDonald Gary McCarthy Rahm Emanuel Anita Alvarez Jon Burge Charles S. Johnson E. Franklin Frazier W.E.B. Du Bois Alfred Lingle Phillip Atiba Goff Jane Addams William Ripley Albert Murray William J. Bratton George Kelling James Q. Wilson Al Gore Michael Bloomberg Ray Kelly David Gregory Rudolph Giuliani Joanna Rothkopf Edwin H. Sutherland
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Lynch mobs, chain gangs, and popular views of black southern criminals that defined the Jim Crow South are well known. We know less about the role of the urban North in shaping views of race and crime in American society.

Following the 1890 census, the first to measure the generation of African Americans born after slavery, crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land of opportunity were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites - liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners - as indisputable proof of blacks' inferiority. In the heyday of "separate but equal," what else but pathology could explain black failure in the "land of opportunity"?

The idea of black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America, as were African Americans' own ideas about race and crime. Chronicling the emergence of deeply embedded notions of black people as a dangerous race of criminals by explicit contrast to working-class whites and European immigrants, this fascinating book reveals the influence such ideas have had on urban development and social policies.




RUNNING TIME ⇒ 12hrs. and 43mins.

©2010 Khalil Gibran Muhammad 2017 Tantor
Language
English
Format
Audible Audio
Publisher
Tantor Audio
Release
August 01, 2017
ISBN
0674035976
Lynch mobs, chain gangs, and popular views of black southern criminals that defined the Jim Crow South are well known. We know less about the role of the urban North in shaping views of race and crime in American society.

Following the 1890 census, the first to measure the generation of African Americans born after slavery, crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land of opportunity were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites - liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners - as indisputable proof of blacks' inferiority. In the heyday of "separate but equal," what else but pathology could explain black failure in the "land of opportunity"?

The idea of black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America, as were African Americans' own ideas about race and crime. Chronicling the emergence of deeply embedded notions of black people as a dangerous race of criminals by explicit contrast to working-class whites and European immigrants, this fascinating book reveals the influence such ideas have had on urban development and social policies.




RUNNING TIME ⇒ 12hrs. and 43mins.

©2010 Khalil Gibran Muhammad 2017 Tantor
Language
English
Format
Audible Audio
Publisher
Tantor Audio
Release
August 01, 2017
ISBN
0674035976